Sharespark Media

Share your story. Spark your potential.

Share your story. Spark your potential. Sharespark is a movement towards digital literacy so that you can harness the power of media to achieve meaningful goals.

According to a 2015 Kaplan Test Prep survey, 40% of college admissions officers browse social media profiles to learn more about admissions candidates. That means it’s pretty likely that decision-makers at colleges and scholarship-granting organizations are taking a peek at your profiles.
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YouTube it still ranks No. 3 in the United States in web traffic, behind only Google and Facebook. In the world, it surpasses Facebook for No. 2.
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Aided by the convenience and constant access provided by mobile devices, especially smartphones, 92% of teens report going online daily — including 24% who say they go online “almost constantly,” according to a new study from Pew Research Center.
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More than half (55%) of teens say they spend time with their closest friend online, doing things like interacting on social media or playing video games.
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With a smartphone or without, 91 percent of teens report that they access the internet from their phone. Among this group, 94 percent report they access internet on their phone daily or more often!
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23% of Snapchat’s monthly U.S. users are ages 13-17.
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Around 40% of the world population has an internet connection today.
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In 2016, 78 percent of U.S. Americans had a social network profile, representing a five percent growth compared to the previous year.
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Here are five critical skills every new college graduate should have: 1. Every graduate needs to be “digitally aware.” 
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Of smartphone users, 91% look up information on their smartphones while in the middle of a task.
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88% of US teens have access to a mobile phone. Many teens use their smartphone as a substitute for a computer.
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